FISH

Here is a rundown of my favourite fish that you will find in my recipes.

 
 
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Sardines

Like mackerel, sardines also have a strong flavour so probably aren’t the best option if you are a fish newbie. Plus they do take a little bit of work to prepare since you need to debone fresh sardines after you cook them.

 What I love about sardines is how rich they are in omega three fatty acids while being low in mercury. They taste amazing grilled with lots of seasoning and served with a big green salad. You don’t need to overdo it. Grilled with a little bit of olive oil,  fresh or dried herbs, a squoosh of lemon and a squeeze of lime and they are good to go.

 
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Mackerel

Mackerel is another incredible oily fish packed with omega three fatty acids. Like salmon how healthy this fish is, depends on where it was sourced from. As I will be discussing later in this guide one of the downsides to eating fish is that nowadays they can contain high levels of mercury.

 To help you navigate your fish selection I have therefore created a nifty guide showing you the mercury levels of different fish from low, medium to high. As you will see from this, the best mackerel to buy is North Atlantic mackerel.

If you have never eaten mackerel, be warned it does have a strong flavour. As a result, it probably isn’t the best fish start with if you are new to eating fish or trying fish for the first time. I would recommend starting with something plainer like sole to ease yourself in. Once you are used to eating fish, mackerel is awesome.

 
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Trout

Trout is a lovely fish with a deliciously mild flavour that can be jazzed up whichever way you fancy. It’s a great fish to try if you are a fish newbie because it is mild with a light texture. When buying trout go for fresh water over farmed. Some supermarkets may stock this.

 Alternatively, you should be able to source it from your local fish market or fishmongers. They will also be able to fillet the trout for you, so all you need to do is pop it under the grill when to get home.

Yummo.

 
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Tuna

Tuna is rich in omega three fatty acids which is a big thumbs up, however, because it is such a big fish it also has a high mercury content. Although tuna is one of the most popular fish in the modern day diet, most people prefer to eat it tinned as opposed to fresh.

The problem is that the canning process squeezes out all the health giving omega three fatty acids while leaving the high mercury content behind.  I think some fresh tuna now and again is fine, but I would avoid it if it’s tinned.

 
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Salmon

Packed with omega three fatty acids, this is one of my favourite go-to fish. But beware not all the salmon you find in the supermarket is healthy. This fish typically falls into three categories. The one to avoid is farmed salmon, as it typically contains PCBs and other chemicals.

 Next, there is organic salmon which is a better option than the farmed since organic standards improve not only the welfare of the fish but also more strictly regulate the use of chemicals and antibiotics. As part of this program, I recommend opting for Wild Alaskan salmon where possible. Most supermarkets now stock this.

You will find it’s slightly redder in colour and has a chewier texture to the farmed and organic salmon but tastes just as delicious.