Natural Flavours

Here is a rundown of my favourite natural flavouring that you will find in my recipes.

 
 
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Tamari

If there is one dressing I couldn’t live without, it is wheat free tamari. I use this in my salad dressings, stir-fries, soups, stews, mar- inades and sauces. It has a lovely flavour and works well with ginger and garlic.

Tamari is a soy sauce, made from brewing fermented soybeans. The reason I prefer it to commercial soy sauce is because it is wheat and sugar-free. The soy sauce that you get in supermarkets usually contains additives, preservatives, MSG, corn syrup, sugar, and wheat.

So make sure you check the labels and buy the wheat free organic tamari. I’m not a big fan of overly processed soy. However, tamari is a ferment- ed form of soy that I love.

You can store this in the cupboard once opened. If you prefer to avoid fermented products, then an alternative to tamari would be Bragg Liquid Aminos. If you have a problem with soy or are allergic to it, then neither of these will work for you.

 
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Raw Cacao

Raw cacao will be your new best friend if you are a chocoholic. If you love chocolate, then you will love raw cacao since it contains all the same, com- pounds that make chocolate so irresistible. First up there is phenylethyl- amine, which helps increase mental focus and alertness. Then there are the inhibitors, which help boost your feel-good brain chemicals serotonin, dopamine and adrenaline.

Originating from the beans of the cacao tree in Africa, raw cacao is packed full of essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, zinc, potassium, and sulphur. I prefer raw cacao to cocoa powder because it is the unrefined version.

This means it is still rich in all the natural nutrients of the cacao bean. In fact, raw cacao beans have an incredible antioxidant profile; they have 14 times more antioxidant power than red wine, 20 more times than green tea, and 7 times more antioxidant oomph than dark chocolate.

 
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Tahini

Tahini is paste made from ground sesame seeds. It is delicious added to dressings, dips and sauces. The mild creamy texture of tahini is divine. 

I often drizzle it into my stir-fries, over salads or whipped up with tamari or apple cider vinegar to make delicious tasty pastes. 

 
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Garlic

Garlic is  one of my favourite spices alongside ginger.  It's lovely pungent scent can help bring out the flavours of your dishes. It tastes delicious added to veggies and roasted in the oven. 

I wouldn't add to my juices and smoothies, but I think it can work well raw in dressing and dips.

 
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Herbamare

Herbamare is a proprietary blend of herbs and sea salt created by the famous Swiss naturopath Alfred Vogel.

This seasoning contains kelp, thyme, rosemary, lovage, garlic, basil, marjoram, parsley, onions, celery leaves, chives and leek. These have been mixed with French sea salt and steeped for about a year before being dehydrated.

I use herbamare to add flavour to stir-fries, soups, stews and steamed vegetables. Herbamare is perfect for anyone who doesn’t feel confident in what savoury flavourings mix well. A sprinkle or two of this sassy seasoning is a fabulous way to add incredible flavour to any dish.

 
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lemons

Lemons are one of the best things to throw in your morning green juice. They give them a lovely zingy flavour, especially if you add a little ginger, making the whole juice taste fresh. 

Another excellent way to start the morning is to add fresh lemon to hot water first thing. It’s a fabulous way to support your digestive system when you first wake up and to love your liver.

You’ll find I use lemons in my green juices, smoothies, fruit infused water, salad dressings, marinades and desserts. 

 
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Miso Paste

Miso paste has a very similar flavour to tamari. It is high in protein and is also made from fermented soybeans. Miso paste can be interchanged with tamari although it has a thicker texture. In NourisH, you will find I add it to stocks, sauces, dressings, and side dishes.

I use different types of miso to season different dishes. Each type of miso has a different flavour personality. The flavour will depend on the type of miso that you buy and the way that’s it’s been produced. You can get brown rice miso, white rice miso, Shiro miso, yellow miso, and Yakata miso.

I usually avoid the fermented miso because it contains barley. This means that it isn’t gluten free.  Again if you have soy allergies, miso is not going to be suitable for you.

 
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Ginger

Ginger has a lovely strong warming flavour and can add a little heat to your raw vegetables juices and smoothies, 
 
I love it freshly grated into stir-fries and salads. 

It can be a beautiful flavour to add to dressings, marinades or dips or even tea.

 
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Carob

Carob has a natural caramel flavour making it great for using in baking, smoothies, and desserts. I love to switch between carob powder and raw cacao when I am adding flavour to sweet treats.

In many ways, carob is a healthier substitute for cacao and cocoa because it is free of caffeine and theobromine. This makes it less stimulating on the system. Packed with vitamins and minerals such as vitamin B, potassium, phosphorus and pectin, it is awesome for supporting your digestive system.

The reason I love using Carob is because it is naturally sweet but not as overpowering as Cacao. It is, perfect for those recipes you want to sweeten without making the dish taste too chocolatey. 

You can buy carob powder, raw or toasted. However, it is mostly the toasted version that you will get in the mainstream supermarkets. In my recipes, I use the raw variety. You can pick this up at most health food stores, or you can order it online.

 
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Celtic Sea Salt

Natural sea salt comes in a variety of different colours. Celtic sea salt is greyish while Himalayan sea salt is pink. Both of these are very alkalising and supportive of the system. Most of the salt that people are consuming as part of the modern-day diet is from inland deposits. It has therefore been highly refined. These deposits are heated at high temperatures, bleached, iodized, refined, and diluted. They are then combined with anti-caking agents which can be highly toxic in large quantities. Potassium and sodium iodide is added to create iodized salt. Then sugar, sodium carbonate, sodium, sodium silicate are used to make it white. This makes the salt it easy to pour, but also completely strips it of all its nutritional value.

Sea salt, on the other hand, goes through a much simpler and natural process as all they do is dehydrate the sea water under the sun. This leave be- hind all the alkalising minerals your body need such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. These minerals help maintain a healthy pH balance in your body and enable you to eliminate any acidity. Sea salt can make an awe- some addition to almost any dish.

 
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Vanilla Extract

You will find that I use vanilla flavouring in many of the smoothie and baked goods recipes. It helps to give a refreshing, subtle sweetness to the recipes. I love combining it with nuts, fruit and chocolate. You have several different options when it comes to adding vanilla flavouring to your recipes.You can opt for a natural vanilla pod, vanilla paste or a vanilla extract. The first two can be pricier, with the extract being the least expensive. You will find I use each of these depending on the type of dish I am creating.

I want you to be very particular about the quality of the extract or paste you use. Opt for organic, alcohol-free, pure extract or paste. If you have soy allergies, be careful that you are choosing one that is glycerine-based, as opposed to being made with soybean oil. Avoid imposter imitation vanilla extracts or vanilla flavoured extracts. These are packed with sneaky sugar and treated with crafty chemicals. They are also toxic and don’t compare to the pure natural vanilla extract.

 
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Pink Himalayan Sea Salt

Natural sea salt comes in a variety of different colours. Celtic sea salt is greyish while Himalayan sea salt is pink. Both of these are very alkalising and supportive of the system. Most of the salt that people are consuming as part of the modern-day diet is from inland deposits. It has therefore been highly refined. These deposits are heated at high temperatures, bleached, iodized, refined, and diluted.

They are then combined with anti-caking agents which can be highly toxic in large quantities. Potassium and sodium iodide is added to create iodized salt. Then sugar, sodium carbonate, sodium, sodium silicate are used to make it white. This makes the salt it easy to pour, but also completely strips it of all its nutritional value.

Sea salt, on the other hand, goes through a much simpler and natural pro- cess as all they do is dehydrate the sea water under the sun. This leave be- hind all the alkalising minerals your body need such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. These minerals help maintain a healthy pH balance in your body and enable you to eliminate any acidity. Sea salt can make an awe- some addition to almost any dish.